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WW2 EAST AFRICA COMMAND FORMATION SIGN

WW2 EAST AFRICA COMMAND FORMATION SIGN

A rare 1st pattern formation sign, Some glue and paper to reverse. 1940 pattern.

Code: 54598

SOLD


E11R GRENADIER GUARDS ASSOCIATION BADGE

E11R GRENADIER GUARDS ASSOCIATION BADGE

An enamel badge, with Gaunt maker to reverse.

Code: 54603

17.00 GBP


WW2 X CORPS FORMATION SIGN

WW2 X CORPS FORMATION SIGN

A fine unused 1942 pattern

Code: 54615

60.00 GBP


WW2 OFFICERS DEMS FORMATION SIGN / SHOULDER TITLE.

WW2 OFFICERS DEMS FORMATION SIGN / SHOULDER TITLE.

A fine scarce Army Officers bullion British: World War Two “D.E.M.S.”(Defensively Equipped Merchant Ship) title. Circa.1939/45

Defensively Equipped Merchant Ships (DEMS) badge. The badge was worn below the gunnery rating badge on the upper right sleeve of the working rig uniform or Battle-Dress blouse of qualified personnel. This badge would normally have seriffed letters. Army personnel also qualified for this duty and wore the DEMS badge below a gunnery rate's badge on the Battle-Dress blouse.

Reference; https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/30068688

Code: 54610

110.00 GBP


E11R GRENADIER GUARDS SHOULDER TITLES PAIR STAYBRIGHT ANODISED.

E11R GRENADIER GUARDS SHOULDER TITLES PAIR STAYBRIGHT ANODISED.

A pair of Anodised Shoulder titles.

Code: 54606

12.00 GBP


WW2 206th INDEPENDENT INFANTRY BRIGADE FORMATION SIGN

WW2 206th INDEPENDENT INFANTRY BRIGADE FORMATION SIGN

A fine rare black chess figure (King) printed on red square formation sign. Used between December 1941 and October 1943.

The brigade was formed under the title of 206th Independent Infantry Brigade (Home) for service in the United Kingdom on 12 October 1940 by amalgamation of Headquarters Lothian Sub-Area and No 6 Infantry Training Group in Scottish Command. It originally comprised three newly raised infantry battalions and one Territorial Army machine gun battalion that had seen service in the Battle of France.

Reference; Jon Mills BoBD Vol 1 page 201,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/206th_Independent_Infantry_Brigade_(United_Kingdom)

Code: 54608

220.00 GBP


WW1 KINGS SHROPSHIRE LIGHT INFANTRY / 8th BATTALION LEEDS RIFLES ROIX DE GUERRE ROSETTE COCKADE.

WW1 KINGS SHROPSHIRE LIGHT INFANTRY / 8th BATTALION LEEDS RIFLES ROIX DE GUERRE ROSETTE COCKADE.

A rare ribbon rosette, cockade, complete with central button " cap badge " with rusted pin fitting and two blades to the reverse. The cockade formed from the ribbon of the French Croix De Guerre worn on the service dress cap by the 4th. Battalion K.S.L.I & 8th Battalion The Prince of Wales's Own (West Yorkshire Regiment) (Leeds Rifles). The French Croix De Guerre Awarded to certain British Units by the French Army in WW I for their support, most units wear it as a strip of ribbon on the arm.


The 1st/4th King's Shropshire Light Infantry wore a C de G cockade on the service cap up to 1941.
The tradition is now maintained by officers, WOs and sergeants of Bn HQ and E Coy of 5 LI (Volunteers).
The cockade consists of a rosette with central button and two swallow tails in the red and green of the C de G ribbon.

4th Bn KSLI, in commemoration of the gallant exploits of 1/4 KSLI at La Montagne dear Bligny on 6/6/1918 all personnel were on 3/6/1922 presented with cockades of 1914-18 C Dr G ribbon to be worn on the left side of the SD caps by all ranks.
On 1/8/1941 as an economy measure the wearing of the cockade was restricted to officers and members of the band. All other personally wore instead a 1/2" deep shoulder flash of the C de G ribbon (without the original bronzed palm emblem) at the shoulder point on both sleeves of the BD blouse.

Army Order Number 431

Grant of Honorary Distinction

His Majesty The King has been graciously pleased to approve of the officers, warrant officers, non-commissioned officers and men of the 8th (Leeds Rifles) Battalion The West Yorkshire Regiment (The Prince of Wales's Own) being permitted to wear in their headdresses on all ceremonial parades, a Cockade of the Colours of the French Croix de Guerre in commemoration of their exploits at La Montaigne de Bligny in 1918, for which they were 'cité' in the Orders of the 5th French Army.

Code: 54609

280.00 GBP


WW2 INDIAN 19th K.G.O. LANCERS, KING GEORGES OWN LANCERS SHOULDER TITLE

WW2 INDIAN 19th K.G.O. LANCERS, KING GEORGES OWN LANCERS SHOULDER TITLE

A fine woven red lettering on yellow curved shoulder title. Has a small moth hole next too "E" and glue residue to reverse.

19th King George V's Own Lancers, which was a regular cavalry regiment of the British Indian Army. It was formed in 1922, by the amalgamation of 18th King George's Own Lancers and 19th Lancers (Fane's Horse). On Partition of India in 1947, the regiment was allotted to Pakistan.

During the Second World War, the 19th KGVO Lancers was the divisional Reconnaissance Regiment of 25th Indian Infantry Division and fought in the Third Arakan Campaign in Burma. In November 1944, the 25th Indian Division cleared the Mayu Range down to Foul Point and occupied Akyab Island. These actions included the decisive Battle of Kangaw and landings at Myebon and Ru-Ywa to intercept the retreating Japanese. The regiment was actively engaged in these battles. In May, a squadron of 19th KGVO Lancers took part in the seaborne assault landing near Rangoon, which led to the capture of the Burmese capital. In April 1945 the 25th Indian Division was withdrawn to South India to prepare for the invasion of Malaya. Although Japan surrendered in August, the operation proceeded as planned and the 25th Division along with 19th KGVO Lancers was the first formation to land in Malaya. It then proceeded to occupy the capital Kuala Lumpur and accepted the surrender of the Japanese Army.

Code: 54588

90.00 GBP


WW2 ENSA SHOULDER TITLE

WW2 ENSA SHOULDER TITLE

E.N.S.A. (Entertainments National Service Association ) cloth shoulder title. White embroidered lettering on black. Title detail shows wear, but are otherwise moth and damage free.


E.N.S.A. was an organisation set up in 1939 by Basil Dean and Leslie Henson to provide entertainment for British armed forces personnel during World War II. ENSA operated as part of the Navy, Army and Air Force Institutes. Many pre & post war well know British radio and TV personalities served with E.N.S.A. George Formby, Gracie Fields and Frankie Howerd to name but a few.

Code: 54587

55.00 GBP


WW2

WW2 "52nd" 2nd BATTALION OXFORDSHIRE & BUCKINGHAMSHIRE 6th AIRBORNE SHOULDER TITLE

An extremely rare shoulder title, in mint condition.

2nd Battalion

In 1941 the 2nd Battalion re-roled as an airborne, specifically an Air Landing, unit, joining the 1st Airborne Division and in 1943 the 6th Airlanding Brigade, 6th Airborne Division. As part of Operation Tonga just before the landings on D-Day 6 June 1944, D Company, 2nd Ox & Bucks Commanded by Maj. John Howard as well as Royal Engineers and men of the Glider Pilot Regiment (totalling 181 men), were to land via 6 Horsa gliders to capture the vital Pegasus Bridge over the Caen Canal and the bridge over the Orne River (known as Horsa Bridge and east of Pegasus). This was intended to secure the eastern flank to prevent German armour from reaching the British 3rd Infantry Division that was landing on Sword Beach.
Pegasus Bridge

The Ox and Bucks landed very close to their objectives at 16 minutes past midnight—the first Allied unit to land in France—they poured out of their battered gliders, completely surprising the German defenders, and taking the bridges within 10 minutes, losing two men—Lieutenant Den Brotheridge and Lance-Corporal Greenhalgh—in the process. One Glider assigned to the capture of Horsa Bridge was landed at the bridge over the River Dives, some 7 miles from where they were meant to land.

They, in spite of this, captured the River Dives bridge, advanced through German lines towards the village of Ranville where they eventually rejoined the British forces. The Ox & Bucks were reinforced half an hour after the landings by 7 Para, with further units arriving shortly afterwards.

The Germans launched many attempts to re-capture the bridges, all being repulsed. Later in the day, at about 1:00pm, Lord Lovat and elements of his 1st Special Service Brigade arrived to relieve the exhausted defenders, followed by the British 3rd Infantry Division. The operation was immortalised in the film The Longest Day.

As the first day of the landings closed, more reinforcements arrived as part of Operation Mallard, they included the rest of the 2nd Ox & Bucks. Lieutenant Colonel Mark Darell-Brown DSO replaced Lieutenant Colonel Michael Roberts who had been injured during the landings and remained in command of the Battalion during the defence of the Ardennes and on the Rhine landing. On 7 June the Battalion captured the small village of Herouvillette and then headed for the village of Escoville where they met some extremely determined resistance.

Having experienced intense fighting with German troops supported by armour and unable to successfully dig in and hold the village, the Battalion withdrew, moving back to Herouvillette where they took part in its defence. The Battalion subsequently held the line on Bréville ridge until August, then taking part in the British breakout and advance to the Seine that began in August, known as Operation Paddle. After a successful offensive, the 2nd Ox & Bucks, along with the rest of 6th Airborne, was withdrawn to the UK in early September to recuperate and reorganise.

By then, of the original 181 men that had taken part in the Pegasus and Horsa operation, just 40 remained fit for active duty. The 2nd Ox and Bucks and the rest of the 6th Airborne were then rushed back to Belgium to take part in the defence of the Ardennes after the German invasion on 16 December.

By the time the Battalion arrived in the Ardennes the German offensive had lost its momentum. One of its companies was involved in heavy fighting whilst in support of 13 Parachute Battalion in the village of Bure. The 2nd Ox and Bucks remained in the Ardennes until 24 January. The Battalion then moved to the Netherlands, before returning to Britain in late February.

The 2nd Ox and Bucks were once again involved in a gliderborne air assault landing known as Operation Varsity the objective of which was to cross the Rhine. Operation Varsity which began on 24 March 1945 was the last major battle on the Western Front during the Second World War.

The Battalion, like many others during the assault, suffered heavily as the Germans met the landing gliders with ferocious fire in the air and on the ground, suffering hundreds of casualties. It saw very heavy fighting at Hamminkeln, where its objectives were the railway station and the bridge over the River Issel, having to undertake a bayonet charge to take the bridge. The Germans launched a number of counter-attacks, all of which were repelled. The Battalion subsequently took a leading part in the 300 mile advance across Germany, mostly on foot, including taking part in the opposed crossing of the Weser and eventually linking up with the Russians near the Baltic port of Wismar on 3 May 1945.

The Battalion provided the Guard of Honour for the meeting between British commander Field Marshal Montgomery and his Russian counterpart, Rokossovsky, at Wismar on 7 May 1945.

Reference ; http://www.lightbobs.com/the-tale-of-a-few-bridges---2-oxf--bucks-li-1944-45.html

Code: 54586

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